How do you tranport your rifles to the range?

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desert deuce
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Re: How do you tranport your rifles to the range?

Post by desert deuce » Fri Sep 24, 2021 12:22 pm

Here is the Pelican site, way less money than SKB.

Looking at their cases would not surprise me if Pelican makes the hard cases for Cabelas.

https://www.pelican.com/us/en/shop/prod ... on%20Cases
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semtav
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Re: How do you tranport your rifles to the range?

Post by semtav » Fri Sep 24, 2021 12:57 pm

DD,
Why don't you open that PM I sent you a month or so ago, so I can get it out of my outbox.

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Re: How do you tranport your rifles to the range?

Post by Lumpy Grits » Fri Sep 24, 2021 2:02 pm

desert deuce wrote:
Fri Sep 24, 2021 12:22 pm
Here is the Pelican site, way less money than SKB.

Looking at their cases would not surprise me if Pelican makes the hard cases for Cabelas.

https://www.pelican.com/us/en/shop/prod ... on%20Cases
If your bbl is longer than 30", it might not fit in a Pelican Case.
Gary
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Re: How do you tranport your rifles to the range?

Post by Kenny Wasserburger » Fri Sep 24, 2021 5:19 pm

Gary, sorry you’re wrong

Storm which pelican bought out does carry a case. Randy Clear Creek posted this earlier. They are excellent cases I own several.

KW
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Michael Johnson
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Re: How do you tranport your rifles to the range?

Post by Michael Johnson » Fri Sep 24, 2021 5:46 pm

I too use the cases that Shiloh used to ship the rifle to me. I also have a couple of the SKB rifle cases. One came with a 416 Rem Mag that I bought from a retired partner. That case had gone to Africa and back a couple of times with that rifle. I bought a second one before my oldest son and I did an unguided Caribou hunt in Alaska. At Seattle (SeaTac airport) I watched from the aircraft as those two cases went up the ramp. I saw one of the two cases rattle of the ramp to the pavement 10 feet below. To say I was concerned would be the understatement of the year!. In Fairbanks at the airport, I examined the two cases. Major blemish on one, but no dents or cracks. My Kimber Talkeetna 375 inside looked fine. One shot at a hundred yards on a boulder in camp was spot on. I still have not adjusted that scope. Those SKB cases are awesome in my opinion.

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Re: How do you tranport your rifles to the range?

Post by Gamerancher » Fri Sep 24, 2021 5:48 pm

I can vouch for the Pelican/Storm cases. The one in the picture Kenny posted will fit my Shiloh, my CPA and my .22. I wouldn't want to walk far with it fully loaded up like that but it does it's job to protect the contents. I've flown with it over to the U.S.A 5 times and despite their best efforts, the airline has not been able to damage my rifles. The case has a few battle scars but keeps on going.
Laying flat in the bed of my pick-up, I can stack a bunch of stuff on top without worrying about damaging my rifles. I've travelled all over Australia with it, ( our Nationals are shared around all states ), 2500 miles one way to the furthest, the shorter trip to our island state of Tasmania requires an overnight ferry trip where they take your guns and put them into storage, ( you'd cringe if you saw the way they just jamb them into their security cage ), I am confident my rifles will be fine in the Pelican/Storm case. :)
Edit; I believe mine is a different model number to that pictured but same brand/design.
Out in western NSW where it don't rain much.
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J.B.
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Re: How do you tranport your rifles to the range?

Post by J.B. » Fri Sep 24, 2021 5:55 pm

I'd be another vote for the Pelican/ Storm cases. Mine has made two trips overseas ( remember when we could travel :cry: ) from Australia to the U.S.
and that left a mark or two but they are still very much up to a few more trips yet. 14,000 miles round trip and of course most of the damage happens in the 1000 yd trip from the check in bay to the cargo hold of the aircraft. Once the wheels are up they are as safe and secure as those seated above them. I had some purpose built cases made of reinforced aluminium over plywood and lined with eggshell foam and they performed well also but the polycarbonate shells definitely assist with some level of 'impact absorption' and bounce back and I dont think this is a bad thing. hth.

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ScrapMetal
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Re: How do you tranport your rifles to the range?

Post by ScrapMetal » Sat Sep 25, 2021 3:33 am

desert deuce wrote:
Thu Sep 23, 2021 10:54 pm
Ah, haa, Scrapmetal is a self employed businessman. So when I express the opinion that every piece of equipment I buy is viewed as a durable investment that requires no further explanation.

So the basics. First, find a peruse the Buffalo Arms Website, as they have a lot of what you will need that may be hard to find in Omaha. If you want to shoot good scores (targets) you will need good bullets. That means you need to become a bullet caster. Several places sell pre alloyed metals. If you are in or associated with a commercial scrap yard you may save some money but expend a lot more time in finding lead and tin there and mixing it yourself. You will need a reliable lead melting pot, a lead dipper and a quality bullet mould with handles. Pan lubing is probably the best way to get started so you will need some bullet lube.

45-70's, in my experience, are notoriously easy to work with so you have about all you need there to get started once you decide on sights.

Maybe thinking in the terms of dividing your time up into short term and longer term goals and working through them incrementally will work best in your case. Starting off accumulating what you need to cast bullets and load them in to cartridges range ready. Then what you will need at the range when you go shoot, starting maybe 50 yards to get your sights more or less wind zeroed and get the hang of shooting the rifle, then stretch out to 100 yards. More or less when your groups are about 2-2 1/2 minutes at each increasing distance until you get to 600 yards should take you a while and you will incrementally improve in the broader aspects of shooting these rifles well.

Think of this in the athletic sense of crawl, walk, jog, run and enjoy each phase of the exercise.
Thanks DD, more good advice and "I'm working on it." :) I've already used Buffalo Arms quite a bit and it's where I purchased my first hundred rounds of .45-70 just to get started. Right now they seem to have a problem keeping things in inventory though.

From my reading and following the forums I knew that I would have to get in to casting before I bought my first Sharps and it was part of the reason that it appealed to me. So far I have collected most everything I need to start casting with the exception of the actual moulds. With the Shiloh and Lone Star I plan to start with grease groove and I hope they will be pretty much the same. The Borchardt, I don't know yet as I haven't had time to cast the chamber to see what it'll take. I am probably getting ahead of myself with the Hepburn as it's a .44 2-6/10 (.44-70, .44-90 or .44-100) Remington Straight and it just begs for a paper patched bullet. The reason I mention this is that "in stock" moulds seem to be a bit scarce right now. Once I can get my hands on the right ones I should be ready to get started.

I have a MVA long range Soule sight on the Sharps and an unknown tang site on the Lone Star (Borchardt and Hepburn have only iron at the moment) so I was planning on starting on the 50 yard range to start sighting in then move on to the 100 yard. I'll definitely stay at that range until I can get the kind of groups you suggested. (I doubt my current 100 rounds will go real far though :( ) I'll take it as you suggested and slowly work my way up.

Cases: Boy those SKBs are gorgeous but they might be overkill for me (hey, I can buy another rifle for what one of those costs) I'll keep my eyes open for used ones at the guns shows though. I think a couple of the Pelicans/Storms will be the way for me to get started.

I appreciate everyone's input and I do read and consider everything that is posted. Speaking of which I'd like to thank Kenny W. for his book "The Complete BPTR Shooter" and all the information that it imparts. (Kenny, thank you. FWIW though, think about putting in an illustration/graphic that shows your "Wasserburger Wad Stack" as it would help me to visualize it. :) )

Thanks much, still listening,

-Ron

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desert deuce
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Re: How do you tranport your rifles to the range?

Post by desert deuce » Sat Sep 25, 2021 9:26 am

Once you get the 45-70 up and running to your satisfaction you will gain perspective in your particular situation as you expand out. MVA sights are widely used and durable.

The .44 Hepburn, well, it sounds like perhaps a need to chamber cast it before attempting to start accumulating articles for it. The 44-70 is actually or can be another name for the .44 Maynard so I call it the 44-70 so people will stop looking at me funny :lol: :lol: :lol: The Remington straight duo of 44-90 and 44-100 were specifically developed by Remington for long range shooting back in the 1800's and I shoot both. I believe Remington chambered their Hepburn Long Range Rifles and maybe the Rolling Blocks in both calibers. I use starline cases in all three. I have seen original Hepburns caliber stamped on the underside of the barrel just ahead of the forend so stamped. A 44 S stamp though is probably a 44-77 which was in particular a long range chambering for the Rolling Block long range rifles. Then you have the issue of barrel twist. Later for that.

The Borchardt could be a lot of things caliber wise if original. Even if caliber marked it may be wise to chamber cast that one also.

I shoot Hepburns and Borchardts in target these days and let the Shiloh rest.

Don't worry too much about bullets at this point. Can send you some if needed. Don't need for you to become a mould collector yet. :roll:
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Re: How do you tranport your rifles to the range?

Post by John Bly » Sat Sep 25, 2021 6:47 pm

I've got a Pelican double case. I've used it a few times. With two rifles inside it can give you a hernia just getting it into the truck. I normally use a heavily padded soft case. I leave the tang sight in place if I'm shooting irons. If shooting scope I take the tang sight off. I carry the scope in a wooden case by Woody.
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Re: How do you tranport your rifles to the range?

Post by mdeland » Sun Sep 26, 2021 12:41 am

I had a chance to by a brand new Pelican double rifle case today at a gun shop closure sale for 200.00 even. Seemed like a good deal but it's more case then I need as I don't air line travel to matches outside AK.

ScrapMetal
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Re: How do you tranport your rifles to the range?

Post by ScrapMetal » Sun Sep 26, 2021 3:17 am

desert deuce wrote:
Sat Sep 25, 2021 9:26 am
Once you get the 45-70 up and running to your satisfaction you will gain perspective in your particular situation as you expand out. MVA sights are widely used and durable.

The .44 Hepburn, well, it sounds like perhaps a need to chamber cast it before attempting to start accumulating articles for it. The 44-70 is actually or can be another name for the .44 Maynard so I call it the 44-70 so people will stop looking at me funny :lol: :lol: :lol: The Remington straight duo of 44-90 and 44-100 were specifically developed by Remington for long range shooting back in the 1800's and I shoot both. I believe Remington chambered their Hepburn Long Range Rifles and maybe the Rolling Blocks in both calibers. I use starline cases in all three. I have seen original Hepburns caliber stamped on the underside of the barrel just ahead of the forend so stamped. A 44 S stamp though is probably a 44-77 which was in particular a long range chambering for the Rolling Block long range rifles. Then you have the issue of barrel twist. Later for that.

The Borchardt could be a lot of things caliber wise if original. Even if caliber marked it may be wise to chamber cast that one also.

I shoot Hepburns and Borchardts in target these days and let the Shiloh rest.

Don't worry too much about bullets at this point. Can send you some if needed. Don't need for you to become a mould collector yet. :roll:
I figured it would be simplest to start with the two "modern" guns in .45-70 and you are right as to needing to do a chamber cast of the Hepburn. It's also a .45-70 but who knows what the variation may be.

I had a bit of typo on the Borchardt though. I meant to say the caliber is .44-75 Remington Straight so it's not the Mayard. As best I can tell it shares a chamber with the .44-90 Remington Straight as well as the .44-100 Remington. The rifle I have is actually Remington #3 Hepburn Long Range Military. I'll still have to cast it as well just to see exactly what it will take. I am really looking forward to making some smoke with it. It's going to take some time coming up to speed before I'm ready to tackle the Borchardt and get it on the range.

Here is a really lousy pic of it:
Image

For more lousy pics, and close up ones, here is a link to the files:
http://www.arcaneiron.com/firearms/Borchardt/

Thanks much for the offer of bullets and if things don't quite line up on my end I may try and take you up on that. With any luck I'll get a hold of a mould for them so I can spend some of this winter working on getting my casting right.

Best regards,

-Ron
John Bly wrote:
Sat Sep 25, 2021 6:47 pm
I've got a Pelican double case. I've used it a few times. With two rifles inside it can give you a hernia just getting it into the truck. I normally use a heavily padded soft case. I leave the tang sight in place if I'm shooting irons. If shooting scope I take the tang sight off. I carry the scope in a wooden case by Woody.
Yeah, I figure if I go with the Pelican cases I'll have to get "single" cases to make them easier to get in and out of the truck. For storage at home though I do use Bore Stores - http://borestores.com/ They've been real good for preventing rust but I don't think they'd hold up real well in the back seat of my truck.

Thanks all,

-Ron

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desert deuce
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Re: How do you tranport your rifles to the range?

Post by desert deuce » Sun Sep 26, 2021 9:32 am

Looks like an original Sharps Borchardt Military Rifle in the photograph. Good chance it was originally a 45-70. If the bore is fairly good may be a good idea to shoot it and see what it will do. They were famoulously accurate in the day.

The Hepburn Military may also be a 45-70, but, chamber cast will tell the story. If bore condition is at least fair it may turn out to be a shooter as is also. Does it have 5 land and groove rifling in the bore?

There are a couple of commercial moulds that imitate the original 500 grain govt bullet like the 1881 Saeco and 457125 Lyman.

If you do not have a strap on shoulder recoil reducer/pad you might want to get one before trying either with full loads.
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ScrapMetal
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Re: How do you tranport your rifles to the range?

Post by ScrapMetal » Mon Sep 27, 2021 2:31 am

desert deuce wrote:
Sun Sep 26, 2021 9:32 am
Looks like an original Sharps Borchardt Military Rifle in the photograph. Good chance it was originally a 45-70. If the bore is fairly good may be a good idea to shoot it and see what it will do. They were famoulously accurate in the day.

The Hepburn Military may also be a 45-70, but, chamber cast will tell the story. If bore condition is at least fair it may turn out to be a shooter as is also. Does it have 5 land and groove rifling in the bore?

There are a couple of commercial moulds that imitate the original 500 grain govt bullet like the 1881 Saeco and 457125 Lyman.

If you do not have a strap on shoulder recoil reducer/pad you might want to get one before trying either with full loads.
Another major goof on my part (this is why I shouldn't post at 3:00am !) that I'll blame on my lack of sleep. My Borchardt IS .45-70 and it is the Hepburn that is .44-70-520 :oops: :oops: I'm really not as big of screw up as it would appear, really. :wink:

I've done quite a bit of research on the Hepburn (as much as I can find anyway) and the best I can tell is that it never was a .45-70. Here is a copy of an ad for the rifle that I copied out of the book, "Remington's #3 Hepburn"
Image

I'll have to take some pics of my Hepburn.

Fladerman's and Blue Book both list is as a .44 2-6/10 as well and it uses the same brass as the .44-90 Remington Straight and the .44-100 Remington Straight. (I think they decided that the 75 grain load was a bit light for a 520 grain bullet) I find the gun fascinating and will continue to research for more about it.

As far as the moulds you suggested, would you prefer the Saeco or the Lyman for quality?

Thanks for reminding me to get a recoil pad, I'd forgotten about that. I find that I bruise a lot easier than I used to.

-Ron

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desert deuce
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Re: How do you tranport your rifles to the range?

Post by desert deuce » Mon Sep 27, 2021 7:01 am

3:00 AM and typing? Been there done that. Not to worry.

Now you have me wondering about the #3, definitely would cast the chamber first. My 44-70 uses 45-70 Starline, 44-90 uses 45-90 Starline and the 44-100 uses 45-100 Starline for the .44 Remington Straight guns, AND, I have a Paul Jones Creedmoor bullet mould for both as well as money bullet moulds. :D

The #745 Saeco shoots well in our 45-70's and 45-90's. The 1881 Saeco shoots well in the Trapdoor as does the Lyman 457125. If I were starting over today I would stay with Saeco and the quality of Brooks and Buffalo Arms Moulds are currently the basis from which others are judged today and represent an investment.

The only Hepburns I have seen with the three number stamp were designated target rifles. Which doesn't mean at all that others were not so stamped. Do seem to recall that as Citizen Long Range abated Military Shooting continued and maybe your rifle was intended for military match use. Which is why I am curious about the 5 land and groove rifleing. Also curious, on the underside of the barrel just forward of the receiver are there any X stampings or the stamped initials LLH ?
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