Over primer wads

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Kurt
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Re: Over primer wads

Post by Kurt » Tue Dec 07, 2021 4:31 pm

We didn't get any of the snow that fell an hour north of me but we got 30 mph plus winds and it got down to 16 this morning.
I get enough snow here to make me mount the 6' snow blower to make a path to my target when I cant get to the range. I can crank the kitchen window open take a shot, close it and I don't get cold fingers :D
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desert deuce
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Re: Over primer wads

Post by desert deuce » Tue Dec 07, 2021 6:56 pm

I want another one of them like the one with the purple hood on her coat. One is not enough.
Sometimes you get the chicken, and sometimes you get the feathers!

Kurt
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Re: Over primer wads

Post by Kurt » Tue Dec 07, 2021 7:30 pm

Well DD here she is with her bonnet on
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And here is at age 12 shooting poppy's rifle :D
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The reason a dog has so many friends is because he wags his tail instead of his tongue.

"Socialism is a philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance, and the gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery"Winston Churchill

JonnyV
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Re: Over primer wads

Post by JonnyV » Tue Dec 07, 2021 7:49 pm

Were those targets fired with the under powder wads?

Kurt
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Re: Over primer wads

Post by Kurt » Tue Dec 07, 2021 8:33 pm

:lol: no I don't think Norma uses wads :D she used my .22 CPA rifle at 50 yards :D
The reason a dog has so many friends is because he wags his tail instead of his tongue.

"Socialism is a philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance, and the gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery"Winston Churchill

semtav
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Re: Over primer wads

Post by semtav » Tue Dec 07, 2021 9:57 pm

We've probably all kinda figured out what is needed for good match results. Accurate rifle, great load, good wind reading skills decent eyes and lots and lots of trigger time.
But what skills are we developing with trigger time that we need to recognize we lose so easily when we don't get lots of trigger time.

mike herth
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Re: Over primer wads

Post by mike herth » Wed Dec 08, 2021 6:30 am

Grandchildren are such precious gifts that steal our hearts! I am so blessed to have five that I can’t see often enough. Thank goodness for camera phones!

Good question Semtav. I’m working on weight loss and exercise with hopes of shooting prone next season.😳 And casting bullets focusing on quality rather than quantity.

DeadEye
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Re: Over primer wads

Post by DeadEye » Wed Dec 08, 2021 6:32 am

That was my problem last summer Brian. There were only three shoots to attend and I did not shoot up to my usual standard for that exact reason. At the time I said, "I just can't get comfortable on the gun." I think it fall into the category of 'We don't know what we don't know.'

Paul
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desert deuce
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Re: Over primer wads

Post by desert deuce » Wed Dec 08, 2021 8:59 am

We don't know what we don't know, covers a lot more than shooting. :wink:
Sometimes you get the chicken, and sometimes you get the feathers!

semtav
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Re: Over primer wads

Post by semtav » Wed Dec 08, 2021 7:14 pm

DeadEye wrote:
Wed Dec 08, 2021 6:32 am
'We don't know what we don't know.'

Paul
Obviously there are the tightly held secrets of the shooting.world.

I know in my case, it isn't so much the mechanics of the shot as it is the shot itself.
I easily lose track of what happened and why, shot to shot.

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desert deuce
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Re: Over primer wads

Post by desert deuce » Wed Dec 08, 2021 9:56 pm

El Semtav wrote: "I easily lose track of what happened and why, shot to shot."

Now seriously, no funnin around, I want to expand on that thought a bit.

When I first got into shooting handguns competitively at the national level I was fortunate enough to shoot with several past and current national champions. One of which explained their mental approach to actually firing the shots for score in competition. They described it as going mentally into a semi doe doe state where they were not consciously firing each shot but rather was a spectator observing the sights as some outside force released the shot. ( Described as executing the fundamentals correctly ) Something like watching a movie or video. This shooter would dry fire in position 15 minutes at least once a day every day and when they would go to the range for live fire the object was to see how well the dry firing was going. The idea was to stay on the front sight, maintain sight alignment let the shot go (rather than consciously fire the shot) and FOLLOW THROUGH. There was an emphasis that sight alignment was more important that sight picture.

Of course this is the idea of ingrained muscle memory. With that background in mind and a suggestion from Aero that dry firing in position should be beneficial I gave it a try. Aero also described a combination leather and rubber T shaped impact reducer to go between the hammer and firing pin of my Hepburn Long Range Match Rifle. Of course a 45-70 snap cap was also placed in the chamber. Using a small punch on a black paster I created an aiming point. Instead of cross sticks on the floor I used a wrist rest and shooting mat. It really showed me movement during trigger pull and release and encouraged follow through. Did it improve my scores? Probably helped satisfy that mental question of sufficient preparation but it definitely reinforced and trained up follow through. That staring at sight alignment through hammer fall is eye opening and for me requires conscious concentration and teaches breath control.

In summary where I am at this point is, focus on the front sight to acquire the aiming point, focus on sight alignment, (less on sight picture as the eye will naturally do that) break the shot clean and follow through. What I do notice is that calling the point of impact is surprisingly accurate.

AND, if I comment to my spotter on the shot that, "I have no idea where that one went," it is probably an X or a 10. Which probably means I executed the fundamentals correctly rather than making the shot perfect.

Will this help you? Well, I don't know. There is only one way to find out.
Sometimes you get the chicken, and sometimes you get the feathers!

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VenisonRX
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Re: Over primer wads

Post by VenisonRX » Wed Dec 08, 2021 10:30 pm

To your point there Mr Deuce, something I found to be very valuable for me along with dry fire drills in service pistol/rifle matches were dummy drills. Pretty simple and especially effective training for pistols.

You hand the cleared and opened bolt/slide weapon to a partner. They either load it or don’t and close the action and hand it back to you. You have no idea if it’s going to fire or click so you’re forced to stick to fundamentals and assume click. If you don’t it’ll be obvious. Does a great deal to remove flinch and other bad habits if practiced regularly.

If I remember correctly a sharps does not like to be dry fired so in this case you’d use a snap cap instead of an empty chamber but the effect would be the same. Very humbling learning experience the first time you see how much you flinch.
—Tom

mike herth
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Re: Over primer wads

Post by mike herth » Thu Dec 09, 2021 7:29 am

DD, Very helpful, but please describe what you mean by FOLLOW THROUGH as a lot is happening when the fire is lit. Keeping focused on the front sight, post or aperture?

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powderburner
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Re: Over primer wads

Post by powderburner » Thu Dec 09, 2021 9:39 am

A good post deuce , thank you
I find a lot of what you say has a lot of merit.
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gunlaker
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Re: Over primer wads

Post by gunlaker » Thu Dec 09, 2021 11:50 am

desert deuce wrote:
Wed Dec 08, 2021 9:56 pm

AND, if I comment to my spotter on the shot that, "I have no idea where that one went," it is probably an X or a 10. Which probably means I executed the fundamentals correctly rather than making the shot perfect.
That's an interesting thought Zack. I've had that happen more than a couple of times. I more or less do what you describe, although I don't dry fire. I just practice my position and hold with an aiming point on the far wall in the basement. Just getting the feel of the rifle, as well the position to reinforce muscle memory.

With respect to follow through, once the shot has been released I see what state my hands are in. After recoil is finished, I find that if my grip feels exactly the same as it did before the shot went off then all is going to be good. It's easy to get into the bad habit of relaxing when the shot goes off which pretty much means poor follow through. I spend a lot of time working on my position, grip, and cheek weld. Getting as low as the rules permit, and going though a mental check of all of the "hold variables" before letting off the shot has helped me way more than any load tuning.

Chris.

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