Best way to clean sharps falling block percussion rifles

Support for the 1863 shooter. Discussions of powders, loads, bullets, etc.
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Tmacmi
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed Oct 14, 2020 2:26 pm

Best way to clean sharps falling block percussion rifles

Post by Tmacmi »

I have an 1853 slant breech so I figured this is the best place to post the question.

I spent the better part of 4 hours trying to clean my rifle yesterday after running 24 rounds through it. I had even run simple green and a patch through it after 12 rounds.

I spent 1.5. hours just cleaning the breach block with a brush and tooth pick last night.

This morning I recalled the idea of just putting the breech block and hammer in a pot of boiling water to remove the powder. It worked but then there were rust spots in the areas were the case coloring had worn away and at the nipple. So that took more cleaning.

I corked the barrel and filled it with boiling water about 4 times.

I ran a bore brush and chamber brush down it 6 times

I then took it downstairs and rand some Thompson Center BP solvent down it with a patch about 4 times.

I am now running shooters choice lead solvent down it. I have done it about 12 times and still haven't come up with a clean patch.

What am I doing wrong? I am spending more time cleaning my gun than I am shooting it.
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VenisonRX
Posts: 117
Joined: Thu Aug 29, 2019 6:29 am
Location: Mayflower, Arkansas

Re: Best way to clean sharps falling block percussion rifles

Post by VenisonRX »

I think this part of the forum could use some more participation and I see nobody posted to your question. I’ve got a 63 carbine so I don’t know if it’s different with a slant breach but here’s what I do. I use a bucket of any temperature water and some murphys oil soap. Boiling it will make it oxidize faster and cause the rust so at best it’s as hot as whatever my faucet will spit out. From what I understand using hot water only helps it dry out faster when you take it out and has nothing to do with cleaning action. The oil soap will help prevent rust before it dries all the way and you can then use your favorite rust preventative.

I take my block apart and drop it in there and let it soak in there while I clean the barrel with the same bucket of water and a bore mop. Once the bore mop stops spitting out black water into the bucket I use dry patches to dry it out then whatever oil or solvent you like. I use ballistoil but at that point my barrel is pretty clean so it probably doesn’t matter if I went with plain rem-oil. Then I finish up with a dry patch. Black powder has graphite on it and that’s why you’ll always get some grey on the patches. Don’t worry about that. The water did all the work that needs done and now you’re just protecting the metal. As for the block it gets scrubbed out in the water and dried off. Then a light coat of oil and back into the gun.
—Tom
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VenisonRX
Posts: 117
Joined: Thu Aug 29, 2019 6:29 am
Location: Mayflower, Arkansas

Re: Best way to clean sharps falling block percussion rifles

Post by VenisonRX »

Looks like this was a double post. No idea why that happens. You did have some responses after all. Sorry for the second response. I thought I remembered reading about this before.
—Tom
MHS4575
Posts: 32
Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2012 2:06 pm
Location: Kentucky

Re: Best way to clean sharps falling block percussion rifles

Post by MHS4575 »

I have a 63 Carbine that I typically shoot 100 rounds per outing and for years all I do is after the end of the shooting swab the bore with Ballistol and wipe down the exterior of the gun. Immediately when I get home I dissemble it down to the last screw (I don't remover the hammer or receiver from the stock) and soak the completely dissembled breach block in a small glass or plastic container with Ballistol. The rest of the gun is thoroughly cleaned using patches, pipe cleaners, q-tips and cotton patches and Ballistol. After the gun is free of all black powder fowling I go back the next day and wipe down ever part thoroughly with Hoppes #9. Then WD40. Places not to forget are the "U" under portion of the hammer. under the rear sight. Take it apart. Hand guard comes off. Around the front sight. and the cup of the hammer that strikes the cap. Take a cloth patch damp with Ballistol and slide it between the hammer and receiver. I have shot mine thousands of times and there is not a speck of rust on it. Having a dedicated plastic table, a high quality qun smith's screwdriver set are a must.
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